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Science Communication Material

NASA's Earth Observing System provides a variety of materials available for download. Feel free to choose a category below:

How To: Hyperwall Playlist
PDF icon How to Assemble a Playlist for a Hyperwall Presentation_508[1].pdf

NASA’s Hyperwall is a video wall capable of displaying multiple high-definition data visualizations and/or images simultaneously across an arrangement of screens. Functioning as a key component at many NASA exhibits, the hyperwall is used to help explain phenomena, ideas, or examples of world change. These six steps will help you assemble a Hyperwall playlist, i.e., a list of media files, in chronological order, that you’d like to display on the Hyperwall.

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ICESat-2 Mission Brochure
PDF icon ICESat-2 Mission Brochure PDF (9.2 MB), Binary Data ICESat-2 Mission Brochure iBook

ICESat-2 will take measurements across the globe and provide an incredibly precise height map of our planet in unprecedented detail. Its focus will be on Earth’s poles, including the Arctic region where temperatures are rising faster than at other latitudes. Read more about how this innovative spacecraft will help scientists check on the health of Earth's frozen regions.

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NASA Science 2018 Commemorative Calendar
PDF icon 2018 calendar_color_508.pdf

NASA Science 2018 Commemorative Calendar

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NASA's Operating and Future Earth Science Satellite Missions
PDF icon NASA_Earth Observing Missions LITHO_508.pdf

NASA's operating and future Earth science satellite missions as of May 2018.

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Science Resources (April 2018)
PDF icon NASA Science Resources Booklet_508_Updated April 2018.pdf

This booklet contains weblinks to NASA science resources.

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Seadler 6.7.18 - ABoVE Infographic - FINAL
PDF icon ABoVE_final.pdf

Infographic 1 of 7 in a series for Jack Kaye and Bruce Tagg that show the value of airborne science to Earth science research. Each infographic covers a different airborne campaign and provides a few things we wouldn't have known without its aircraft data.

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Seadler 6.7.18 - SEAC4RS Infographic - FINAL
PDF icon SEAC4RS_final.pdf

Infographic 2 of 7 in a series for Jack Kaye and Bruce Tagg that show the value of airborne science to Earth science research. Each infographic covers a different airborne campaign and provides a few things we wouldn't have known without its aircraft data.

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Seadler 7.11.18 - JUNE Research Results Roundup - FINAL
PDF icon Research Results Review_June18_updated2.pdf

The first version of the Earth Science Research Results Roundup, a compilation of Earth science research results sent to Abby each month from Ames, Goddard, JPL, Langley, and Marshall. These do not include every result sent to Abby, but those she thinks are interesting or different or would interest a wider audience. The language is her quick take on the result based on the original text from the centers, the published paper, and her understanding of the science. She will send these out monthly as a way to get what information about what we're learning to Program Managers, Earth science communicators, and our third-party stakeholder community.

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What Color is the Ocean? Activity Flyer
PDF icon What Color is the Ocean Activity Flyer.pdf

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What's Binary Code?
PDF icon 508.pdf

To process and store data, computers use a simple coding system, called binary code (“bi” means two). Like a simple light switch which has only two positions—ON and OFF—computers encode data using only two binary digits—0 and 1, called bits. All letters (see back), digits, and special characters have been encoded with defined sequences of bits. Most modern character-encoding schemes use a binary string of eight bits.

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